There are several challenges to fulltime RV living. I am talking of the kind of stuff that people know after they have toured more than 40 states in a single go. It is easy enough to set out with friends or family, but after you have been on the road for a while, there are a few things you are bound to learn.

You Don’t Need The Biggest RV

A countrywide RV trip may seem to justify getting a truck jumper at first. But something smaller is a lot easier to maneuver into a campground. It is worth losing backend living space to be able to park easily, because you will need that often.

You Don’t Need Much Stuff For Your Trip

Especially if it is your first time RV-ing, you are likely to stuff the vehicle full of personal effects like clothes, shoes, books, and appliances. If the trip goes well, you won’t use most of those things, and they will just end up in storage. To de-clutter, throw out the stuff you haven’t used in at least a month. Better yet, don’t pack stuff you are not sure you will need.

You Will Figure Out How To Clean Up A Mess

Living in an RV doesn’t allow you to be messy. Cleaning has to be done more than once daily, from doing the dishes to wiping the counter tops, to sweeping the floor and putting out the trash. The bathroom can get dirty quickly, and need regular cleaning.

It Will Take Longer Getting Someplace Than Google Maps Tells You

When you get directions from Google Maps, it is assuming you are driving a car. RVs move slower, especially in traffic, so except any commute to be longer than the service mentions. And prepare to enjoy more sites along the way.

There Will Be Always Something That Needs Repairing

Never assume there is nothing that needs fixing. Your sink may be leaking water onto the counter top, or the jacks are sticking up even after you fixed the battery. Tip: Pushing the red reset button on the power outlet will turn on the fridge after an outage. And don’t ever take out a screw unless you are planning on putting it back.

If you are adventuring with a spouse of significant other, there is plenty of time, so take things slow. Take lunch breaks and enjoy the sights on the road. Taking a trip in an RV is mostly about enjoying yourself, so make sure you do that.